Thursday, August 1st, 2019 from 3:00 PM- 4:30 PM

Location: Upstairs Conference Room of the Udall Building, 725 Camino Lejo, Santa Fe, NM 87505

Cost: $15 Member/$20 Not-yet-Member

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After the Indian wars, many Americans still believed that the only good Indian was a dead Indian. But at Ganado Mission in the Navajo country of northern Arizona, a group of missionaries and doctors–who cared less about saving souls and more about saving lives–chose a different way and persuaded the local parents and medicine men to allow them to educate their daughters as nurses. The young women struggled to step into the world of modern medicine, but they knew they might become nurses who could build a bridge between the old ways and the new.

Come to this engaging lecture to learn of the collisions that led to the establishment of the first Native American nursing school at Ganado Mission. Kristofic’s personal connection with the community creates a nuanced historical understanding that blends engaging narrative with careful scholarship to share the stories of the people and their commitment to this place.

About the lecturer – Jim Kristofic grew up on the Navajo Reservation in northeastern Arizona. He has written for the Navajo Times, Arizona Highways, Native Peoples Magazine, and High Country News. His award-winning books The Hero Twins: A Navajo-English Story of the Monster Slayers and Navajos Wear Nikes: A Reservation Life are both published by UNM Press. He lives in Taos, New Mexico.